The Font-End Development Puzzle

Have you at any point taken a gander at your most loved site and pondered precisely what really mattered to it? Have you taken a gander at the manner in which it was laid out, the manner in which the buttons acted when you clicked them, or any other part of the site and thought, "I wonder how entangled that is?" or, "I wish I could do that"?

Those noticeable webpage highlights are worked through front end development (once in a while additionally called "front end web development"). While website composition is the manner in which a site looks, front end development is the manner by which that plan really gets actualized on the web. In the interim, a front end web developer is the individual who does that execution. This article will separate a portion of the key aptitudes front end web developers use at work. In the interim, you can peruse our guide on all that it takes to begin a web developer vocation here.

Front End Developer Skills?

Front end web developers use three primary coding languages:

HTML
CSS
JavaScript

HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language) and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) are the most basic building blocks of web coding. Without these two things, you can’t create a website design, and all you’ll end up with is unformatted plain text on the screen. You can’t even add images to a page without HTML!

CSS and front end frameworks (the most popular front end framework is Bootstrap) do for CSS what JS Frameworks do for JavaScript: they give you a jumping-off point for faster coding. Since so much CSS starts with exactly the same elements from project to project, a framework that defines all of these for you upfront is super valuable.

CSS Preprocessors are another element that a front end developer can use to speed up CSS coding. A CSS preprocessor adds extra functionality to CSS to keep our CSS scalable and easier to work with. It processes your code before you publish it to your website, and turns it into well-formatted and cross-browser friendly CSS. SASS and LESS are the two most in-demand preprocessors today.

JavaScript lets you add a ton more functionality to your websites, and you can create a lot of basic web applications using nothing more than HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (JS for short). On the most basic level, JS is used to create and control things like maps that update in real time, interactive films, and online games. Sites like Pinterest use JavaScript heavily to make their user interface easy to use.

It’s also the most popular programming language in the world.

jQuery is a JavaScript library: a collection of plugins and extensions that makes developing with JavaScript faster and easier. Rather than having to code everything from scratch, jQuery lets a front end web developer add ready-made elements to projects, then customize as necessary (one reason why knowing JavaScript is so important). You can use jQuery for things like countdown timers, search form autocomplete, and even automatically-rearranging and resizing grid layouts.

JS frameworks (including AngularJS, Backbone, Ember, and ReactJS) give a ready-made structure to your JavaScript code. There are different types of JavaScript frameworks for different needs, though the four mentioned are the most popular. These frameworks really speed up development by giving you a jumpstart, and can be used with libraries like jQuery to minimize how much from-scratch coding you have to do.

REST, simply stands for Representational State Transfer. In basic terms, it’s a lightweight architecture that simplifies network communication on the web, and RESTful services and APIs are those web services that adhere to REST architecture. Read more about REST and RESTful services here.

You could make calls to Facebook’s RESTful API or to Twitter (which also uses RESTful APIs). The general process is the same for any service that uses RESTful APIs.

Responsive and Mobile Design, in the US alone, more people access the internet from their mobile device than from a desktop computer, so it’s no wonder that responsive and mobile design skills are super important to employers. Responsive design means that the site’s layout (and sometimes functionality and content) change based on the screen size and device someone is using.

For example, when a website is visited from a desktop computer with a big monitor, a user would get multiple columns, big graphics, and interaction created specifically for mouse and keyboard users. On a mobile device, the same website would appear as a single column optimized for touch interaction, but using the same base files.

Mobile design can include responsive design, but also includes creating separate mobile-specific designs. Sometimes the experience you want a user to have when visiting your site on a desktop computer is entirely different than what you want them to see when visiting from their smartphone, and in those cases it makes sense for the mobile site to be completely different. A bank website with online banking, for example, would benefit from a separate mobile site that lets users view things like the closest bank location and a simplified account view (since mobile screens are smaller).

Cross-Browser Development, Modern browsers are getting pretty good at displaying websites consistently, but there are still differences in how they interpret code behind the scenes. Until all modern browsers work perfectly with web standards, knowing how to make each of them work the way you want them to is an important skill. That’s what cross-browser development is all about.

Content Management Systems and E-commerce Platforms, did you know, almost every website out there is built on a content management system (CMS). (E-commerce platforms are a specific type of CMS.) The most popular CMS worldwide is WordPress, which is behind-the-scenes of millions of websites, almost 60% of websites that use a CMS use WordPress.

The other most popular CMSs include Joomla, Drupal, and Magento.

Testing and Debugging, it’s a known fact, that as a front end web developer, you will encounter, bugs. However, being familiar with testing and debugging processes is vital.

Unit testing, is the process of testing individual blocks of source code (the instructions that tell a website how it should work), and unit testing frameworks provide a specific method and structure for doing so (there are different ones for each programming language).

Another common type of testing is UI testing, also refered to as, acceptance testing, browser testing, or functional testing, where you check to make sure that the website behaves as it should when a user is actually taking actions on the site. You can write tests that will look for things like particular HTML on a page after an action is taken (like making sure that if a user forgets to fill out a required form field, that your form error box pops up).

Debugging is simply taking all the “bugs” out and fixing the problem or rather, the errors. Different companies use slightly different processes for this.

Problem Solving Skills, from figuring out how to best implement a design, to fixing bugs that crop up, to figuring out how to make your front end code work with the backend code being implemented, development is all about creative problem solving.

Ok so, you’ve created a perfectly-functioning website front end, and you hand it over to the back end developers.. All of a sudden, half of your features stop working. A good front end developer will view this as a puzzle to be solved, rather than a disaster in the making. However, a senior-level front end developer will anticipate these problems and try to prevent them in the first place.